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information_for_astronomers:user_guide:faq [2014/12/11 08:22]
bwinkel [Previewing the data]
information_for_astronomers:user_guide:faq [2019/08/10 21:54] (current)
akraus
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 === How do I get to Effelsberg === === How do I get to Effelsberg ===
 [[information_for_astronomers:user_guide:hints|Observing at Effelsberg]]. [[information_for_astronomers:user_guide:hints|Observing at Effelsberg]].
 +
 +=== Contacting the operators ===
 +
 +The control room can be reached by phone via +49 2257 301 155. The operator's
 +mail address is operateure_at_mpifr.de .
  
 === What receivers/instruments do you got? === === What receivers/instruments do you got? ===
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 === What steps are necessary to calibrate my data? === === What steps are necessary to calibrate my data? ===
 The FITS files contain the Raw data (pure counts), while the "reduced" spectra and continuum scans contained in the ''Class'' files are only partly calibrated by the pipeline. In fact, the pipeline removes the gain factor ("bandpass") from the data using the position-switch or frequency-switch technique, but the result is in units of the noise diode's signal, $T_\mathrm{cal}$. You have to use calibration sources to measure $T_\mathrm{cal}$. For quick'n'dirty calibration you can use values from our [[information_for_astronomers:rx_list|RX list]]. Furthermore, depending on observing frequency you will need to correct for elevation-dependent gain efficiency and atmospheric opacity. Details are discussed in a calibration memo by A. Kraus (on request) and partly in [[http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012arXiv1203.0741W| A&A 540, A140, 2012]]. The FITS files contain the Raw data (pure counts), while the "reduced" spectra and continuum scans contained in the ''Class'' files are only partly calibrated by the pipeline. In fact, the pipeline removes the gain factor ("bandpass") from the data using the position-switch or frequency-switch technique, but the result is in units of the noise diode's signal, $T_\mathrm{cal}$. You have to use calibration sources to measure $T_\mathrm{cal}$. For quick'n'dirty calibration you can use values from our [[information_for_astronomers:rx_list|RX list]]. Furthermore, depending on observing frequency you will need to correct for elevation-dependent gain efficiency and atmospheric opacity. Details are discussed in a calibration memo by A. Kraus (on request) and partly in [[http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012arXiv1203.0741W| A&A 540, A140, 2012]].
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information_for_astronomers/user_guide/faq.txt · Last modified: 2019/08/10 21:54 by akraus     Back to top